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PH Blog

The Programming Historian blog is our space to share news about the project, ideas for how you might use technology in your work, and exciting examples of the Programming Historian applied in the real world. Subscribe to the RSS feed for new blog posts.

July 1, 2020

Second Newsletter of 2020

Jennifer Isasi

A cropped image with the word Summer.


July 1, 2020

Deuxième newsletter de 2020

Jennifer Isasi

Une image recadrée avec le mot l'été.


July 1, 2020

Segundo boletín informativo del 2020

Jennifer Isasi

Imagen recortada con la palabra verano en inglés


June 29, 2020

Why Programming Historian is not fully implementing Plan-S Recommendations

Adam Crymble

Programming Historian has been fully Open Access since day one. For a decade now our team has been publishing academic content and making it freely and widely available online to more than 1-million people per year. In that time, we’ve never charged an author, reader, or a library a penny for accessing our material.


May 26, 2020

Full-Text Search for Lessons

Zoe LeBlanc

In an effort to make finding lessons more user-friendly, we’ve officially launched full-text searching for all our lessons. Previously you could use filter buttons to select lessons based on topic or activity, and sort them by date and difficulty. However, you weren’t able to find lessons based on their content.


May 14, 2020

DOIs Added to All Lessons

Matthew Lincoln

We’ve taken many steps as part of our ongoing work to interconnect the Programming Historian’s open-access, peer-reviewed articles into the larger scholarly ecosystem. In the past, these have included embedding citation metadata in our HTML so you can easily import them with citation managers like Zotero, adding ORCIDs for our lesson contributors, and making sure we maintained persistent URLs and redirects for all our lessons.


May 4, 2020

Call for Editors

Sarah Melton

The English edition of The Programming Historian is seeking editors to work actively to solicit and edit lessons. These lessons should focus on providing humanities and social science scholars with the skills to interpret the outputs of digital methods, allowing readers to move from digital data to publishable research.